La Rochefoucauld & the seventeenth-century concept of the self

by Vivien Thweatt

Publisher: Droz in Genève

Written in English
Published: Pages: 279 Downloads: 497
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Subjects:

  • La Rochefoucauld, François, -- duc de, -- 1613-1680.,
  • Self.

Edition Notes

StatementVivien Thweatt.
SeriesHistoire des idées et critique littéraire -- v. 188
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPQ"1815"T4"1980
The Physical Object
Pagination279 p. :
Number of Pages279
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20018445M

Enjoy millions of the latest Android apps, games, music, movies, TV, books, magazines & more. Anytime, anywhere, across your devices. Through what's prefaced with an insecure humblebrag and largely feels like a vanity project disguised as a neurotic's spat with his ideologies, Fowles manages to: 1. Argue that inequality is a necessary and natural force in the world but also that wealth inequality is bad and should be "evolved" away from 2. Tie self-discovery to anti-statism while using the randomness of circumstances that /5(26). Two French Moralists: La Rochefoucauld/La Bruyère. Odette de Mourgues. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 44 (3) (). James explains the seventeenth-century turn toward understanding human emotion as ##### 3 For a detailed examination of the “currency” of passions as court, see Philippe Desan, “The Economy of Love in La Princesse de Clèves,” in An Inimitable Example: The Case for the Princesse de Clèves, ed. Patrick Henry and John D. Lyons.

Francois VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac (15 September - 17 March ) was a noted French author of maxims and memoirs. The view of human conduct his writings describe has been summed up by the words "everything is reducible to the motive of self-interest," though the term "gently cynical" has also been s: La Rochefoucauld's maxim would certainly indicate that, in his opinion, honnêtes femmes were most uncommon in Old Regime France. If this remarkable being did exist, surely she had to be a "hidden treasure." But what La Rochefaucould implied in his maxim was more than the extraordinary nature of such a female character.

La Rochefoucauld & the seventeenth-century concept of the self by Vivien Thweatt Download PDF EPUB FB2

La Rochefoucauld and the Seventeenth -Century Concept of the Self. By VIVIEN THWEATT. Geneva: Droz, This new study on La Rochefoucauld ana seventeentn-century tnougnt is a timely contribution to a Tiem wnere many ques-tions have remained unanswered.

Although much is known about La Rochefoucauld's. La Rochefoucauld and the Seventeenth-Century Concept of the Self, by Vivien Thweatt.

Esprit Createur. ;Author: Sylvie Romanowski. Get this from a library. La Rochefoucauld and the seventeenth-century concept of the self. [Vivien Thweatt]. La Rochefoucauld And The Seventeenth Century Concept Of The Self by Vivien Thweatt. Download it La Rochefoucauld And The Seventeenth Century Concept Of The Self books also available in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format for read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.

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Download La Rochefoucauld And The Seventeenth Century Concept Of The Self books. Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Thweatt, Vivien. Rochefoucauld and the seventeenth-century concept of the self.

La Rochefoucauld and the Seventeenth century Concept of the Self. Release on no doubt because it is more consistently self-conscious than that of any previous era, the fiction of twentieth-century France seems to illustrate this convergence with special brillance.

and National Prosperity of Marquis de Mirabeau, in his book De. “The Concept of Amour-Propre in the Maximes of La Rochefoucauld.” Nottingham French Studies 7, no. 2 (October ): [ In the following essay, Westgate explores the concept of self-love as. The chief motivating force of human behavior, according to La Rochefoucauld, is amour-propre, or self-love.

The Maximes also demonstrate seventeenth-century society's tendency toward. François VI, duc de La Rochefoucauld, also called (until ) Prince de Marcillac, (born SeptemParis, France—died March 16/17,Paris), French classical author who had been one of the most active rebels of the Fronde before he became the leading exponent of the maxime, a French literary form of epigram that expresses a harsh or paradoxical truth with brevity.

François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac (French: [fʁɑ̃swa d(ə) la ʁɔʃfuko]; 15 September – 17 March ) was a noted French moralist and author of maxims and is part of the literary movement of classicism and best known for his maxims.

Although he only officially published his Memoirs and his Maxims, his literary production is dense. NIETZSCHE AND LA ROCHEFOUCAULD back even more directly to the influence of La: Rochefoucauld.1' It is significant that, while self-interest was the central theme of La Roche-foucauld's Maximes, Nietzsche hardly touches upon the topic after establishing the principle of the impossibility of unegoistic motivation.

The writer, the Duc De La Rochefoucauld, had a philosophy which linked all human action to people's "self-love". Cynical, but not in a mean way. La Rochefoucauld was very good at seeing the hidden selfish "Our virtues are usually only vices in disguise."/5(). Clark, La Rochefoucauld and the Language of Unmasking in Seventeenth-Century France, Geneva 8.

'J'ai remarqué les défauts de l'esprit et du cœur de la plupart du monde, et ceux qui me ne me con naissent que par là, pensent que j'ai tous ces défauts comme si j'avais fait mon portrait'. La Rochefoucauld. During the seventeenth century, especially in French moral philoso-phy, a psychological concept of interest was developed by people like La Rochefoucauld and Pascal (see Heilbron ).

Some of the com-plexity that these authors brought to it can be illustrated by La Rochefoucauld’s maxim “Self-interest blinds some, but enlightens. La Rochefoucauld's themes visited within his Maxims are self-love, vice and virtue, love and jealousy, friendship and self-interest, and passion and pride (among others).

Collected Maxims provides a window into the thought of 17th Century French Court Reviews:   History of European Ideas, Vol. 7, No. 1, pp./86 $ + Printed in Great Britain. @ Pergamon Press Ltd. THE PARA-MORAL PRINCIPLES OF EARLY MODERN SOCIETY: CONTEXTUAL REFLECTIONS UPON THE MAXIMS OF LA ROCHEFOUCAULD* TILO SCHABERTf I.

LEGACY OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY: THE RISE OF THE EGO In the. We all have strength enough to endure the misfortunes of others. This famed work by a noted French author of the Renaissance era, seventeenth-century nobleman Francois de La Rochefoucauld, offers hundreds of brief, brutally honest observations of humankind and its self-serving nature.

The principal objective of this study is to elucidate La Rochefoucauld's concept of truth. This idea will be examined through close textual analysis of both the Maximes and Reflexions diverses.

Although the Maximes have attracted considerable critical attention over the years, the Reflexions diverses have been thoroughly explored by only a few Reviews: 1. Rare is the person who has never known the feelings of apathy, sorrow, and uselessness that characterize the affliction known as melancholy.

In this book, one of Europe's leading intellectuals shows that melancholy is not only a psychological condition that affects individuals but also a social and cultural phenomenon that can be of considerable help in understanding the modern middle class.

La Rochefoucauld's themes visited within his Maxims are self-love, vice and virtue, love and jealousy, friendship and self-interest, and passion and pride (among others). Collected Maxims provides a window into the thought of 17th Century French Court as relevant today as when initially penned.

Five stars without hesitation!Reviews: La Rochefoucauld and the Seventeenth-Century Concept of the Self by Vivien Thweatt. La Rochefoucauld and the Seventeenth-Century Concept of the Self by Vivien Thweatt (p.

) Student's Book by Anny King, Gwen Lansdell (pp. SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY NEWS in the major part of his text, the only part published by La Rochefoucauld. Instead he r eplaces it 14 times b y “self-esteem, ” once b y “self-inter est” and on one occasion suppresses the term completely.

This cannot be because the term “self-love” is judged inappropriate, since it does appear among the. This famed work by a noted French author of the Renaissance era, seventeenth-century nobleman François de La Rochefoucauld, offers hundreds of brief, brutally honest observations of humankind and its self-serving nature.

This book analyses the use of the crucial concept of 'taste' in the works of five major seventeenth-century French authors, Méré, Saint Evremond, La Rochefoucauld, La Bruyère and Boileau. It combines close readings of important texts with a thoroughgoing political analysis of seventeenth-century French society in terms of class and gender.

Henry C. Clark is professor of history at Canisius College. He is author of La Rochefoucauld and the Language of Unmasking in Seventeenth-Century France () and is working on a book on the French encounter with commercial society in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Abstract. Self-interest is one of the fundamental aspects of the traditional theory of economics. Interpreted today as the constant search for one’s own maximum benefit, it is a perspective that is rooted in the psychological selfishness of the seventeenth century, opening into economic thought through the works of authors like Bernard Mandeville and Joseph Butler in the eighteenth century.

La Rochefoucauld, Nicole, and Rousseau among many others, tween the rise of the modern concept of self-interest and the development of moral philosophy and reason of State theory in the seventeenth century. This book brings a lot of additional evidence in support of Hirschman’s. Theobald, Catherine.

"The Many Fictions of La Rochefoucauld: Searching for Sitter, Self, and Society in ‘Portrait de M.R.D.’ and the _Maximes_." Papers on French Seventeenth Century Literature.

(): Literature Criticism from to vol. Thomas J. Thus La Rochefoucauld, in his “Maxims,” as related by Barthes: “The clemency of princes is often only a policy to gain the affection of the people The sage’s constancy is only the.

We all have strength enough to endure the misfortunes of others. This famed work by a noted French author of the Renaissance era, seventeenth-century nobleman François de La Rochefoucauld, offers hundreds of brief, brutally honest observations of humankind and its self-serving nature.La Rochefoucauld's themes visited within his Maxims are self-love, vice and virtue, love and jealousy, friendship and self-interest, and passion and pride (among others).

Collected Maxims provides a window into the thought of 17th Century French Court as relevant today as when initially penned.Self-Interest before Adam Smith inquires into the foundations of economic theory.

It is generally assumed that the birth of modern economic science, marked by the publication of The Wealth of Nations inwas the triumph of the 'selfish hypothesis' (the idea that self-interest is the motive of human action).